Art(ist) in isolation

Challenging times we’re living. Some of us spent weeks and even months living completely different lives from what we had before. Less travelling, less trips to the grocery store, remote office or loss of jobs, the illusion of more time on our hands, loss and grief on different levels: what a good reminder that the only constant in life is change.

Although most people yearn for social interaction, isolation is a lifestyle chosen by many others. We’ve all experienced inner peace after a weekend retreat with no social media and devices at reach, immersed in nature or in deep late night conversations with other sharp and creative minds. So we could only imagine what benefits a secluded lifestyle could bring.

Isolation could be good for your art

Isolation could be good for your art

From an artist’s point of view, nurturing times we’re living. Isolation could be the best thing that will ever happen to an artist. In all truth, some artists choose to live an isolated life from the start. Being alone with their thoughts fuels their creativity and helps them dig a deeper well into inspiration. Artists' biographies are filled with examples of voluntary isolation and even asceticism. Being thinkers and observers, artists tend to step out of society and have a look from the outside in. This way they can be inspiring or critique our ways without being a part of them.

Being creative with what you have

Being creative with what you have

But can you manage staying isolated and creative at the same time? What about resources, supplies? It couldn’t get easier than this with all the online shops at your fingertips. Wait!? Are we talking about our devices again? Yes but only as a means of getting what you need. Shop online at ease, get your art supplies delivered anywhere in the world (some websites even offer free shipping so it beats walking to your art store anyway).
Or maybe the lack of resources is an inspiration in its own way. During the soviet era some dissident russian artists started using their small apartments as art studios and galleries as they were not allowed to display their work in public unless the regime would allow it. So many artists chose to create at home and host art events in their cramped apartments.

There are no limits when it comes to being creative. Pick up a new skill that doesn’t need figuring out a lot of logistics or start documenting the isolation.

Learning something new

Learning something new

Try something else, try to find a new path towards expressing your creativity. Circumstances like this don’t show up very often. Maybe you’re at home more, maybe you have some more free time on your hands, maybe you feel the urge to do something else, something you’ve dreamt about ever since you were a kid or something you always felt you can be good at but never got the chance of trying.

This is it! This is the perfect moment. Pick up a pencil and some paper, order your paints and mediums or maybe start embellishing your home with your creativity. Start your new artistic journey, leave your mark. The benefits will outgrow any difficulties or fears.

Learn how saying I didn’t know I could do this feels like.

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